SPED Homeschool Team

 

There is no one right way to keep your children learning during the summer. For this reason, we thought we would give you a glimpse into what the summer looks like in each of our homeschools and how we each uniquely continue homeschool learning in the summer.  Hopefully our examples will help you embrace the specific needs of your family as you develop the best way to keep your children learning and growing.

 

 

Our Unique Homeschool Summer Learning Paths

 

Amy Vickrey

For the summer, we continue on in our schooling.  We take some days and weeks off as we have family events and need some time off.  However, my son does better with some structure and routine, so keeping up our academics helps.  This also keeps him from having any lost skills over long breaks. We tend to focus on the basics—math, reading, and such.  We also enjoy time outdoors and going swimming!

This summer will be a little different as I will also be working.  It will be interesting to see how everything lines up and if our plans change some.  However, I love the idea of continuing year round so that I don’t have to worry about needing to take time off during the school year for any reason.  If that happens, we won’t be behind because we have spent time together learning as a family throughout the year!

 

Peggy Ployhar

Summer learning for our family has always been more of an unschooling approach between lots of planned activities at camps, church, and classes offered locally in our community.  I guess you could say we spent a lot of that time working on social skills as my children dove into delight-directed learning which made them push through the social barriers they often found inhibiting. Additionally, our family is also big into camping so sometimes over half of our summers were spent at one or more campgrounds living in our RV while exploring God’s great creation and the lessons that awaited us outside our door each morning.

For me I needed a large chunk of down-time from teaching just to make it through the rest of the year, so this yearly break was not only good for my children but also for my mental well-being after been closed up in a house in Minnesota most of the 9 months we were homeschooling. Yes, we did end up having to do some catch-up on forgotten skills over those summer months, but on the flip side my children expanded their learning in many areas that they would not have been expanded if we had not made time for them to participate in very different learning environments during the summer.

My children have so many fond memories of our homeschooling summers. As we finish up our homeschooling years with our youngest in high school, we have plans to keep this tradition going.  Our youngest is already signed up for 2 teen art camps, a week long camp with our church, and a week at iGoven run by Generation Joshua this summer. It will be busy, but as always we are all looking forward to the change of scenery and pace in our homeschool learning.

 

It seems that each year our summers have looked a lit bit different, depending on what we’ve needed at the end of that school year.

 

Cammie Arn

We school year round but our activities change. For example during the typical school year we are involved in a homeschool co-op, a Speech and Debate club and homeschool handbell and vocal choir. We utilize our co-op for history, science and various electives. At home we add in math, Bible and lots of life learning. All in all 4-5 hours per day

We do school in the summer by continuing math, reading, art and a mini-course. Since our co-op ends at the end of April. I do a mini-course for the month of May and 2 weeks into June. This year we are knocking out Government and Personal Finances. This lightens up the pressure of finishing everything during the school year and gives us something to do on the scorching hot Texas summer days.

 

Tracy Glockle

It seems that each year our summers have looked a lit bit different, depending on what we’ve needed at the end of that school year. For many years, we tackled hands-on science, art, music and some of the subjects that didn’t get as much attention during the school year. Other years, we’ve focused on motor skills with lots of physical activity.

One thing I do every time we have an extended break (Christmas or summer) is to have my kids fill out a “bucket list.” These lists include any projects they want to tackle, skills they want to learn (painting, computer coding, bike riding, scooter tricks, etc.), crafts they want to make, and places they want to visit. I limit how many of the activities they can write down that depend on me, and the rest of the ideas are things they can initiate on their own. Our “bucket lists” serve several purposes. First, it’s my reference point for the “I’m bored” complaint. Anytime my kids come to me looking for something to do, I send them back to their bucket list. Also, it gives my kids a chance to work on some executive function skills of self-managing their time and tasks. These bucket lists also give us an idea of our priorities for our break to be a satisfying one: if we can’t get to everything on the list, the kids decide which activities are most important.

 

The freedom that homeschooling offers, allows each of our families the ability to make accommodations which can also be extended into our summer months for what works best for each of our children as well as our families as a whole.  Whatever that looks like, embrace that path and all that awaits you as you take on homeschool learning in the summer with your children.

 

 


Did you know SPED Homeschool is 100% donor funded?

Donate today

 

Please follow and like us:
error

 

Dawn Spence

 

When I was a public school teacher I taught summer school to make extra money. I know the kids dreaded coming to school in the summer when they could have been swimming! I saw though the value as I knew some of my students never cracked a book over the summer. So I taught in units that students would enjoy learning and I would enjoy teaching.

 

Fast forward as a homeschooling mom and I still see the value of summer learning activities or even what can be called year-round schooling. Having a child with special needs I learn that if we walk away from learning for three months, she will have regression. Don’t get me wrong; we play a lot and swim a lot. What else can you do in Texas heat? But I do try to have fun or do units during the summer to change things up.

 

However you decide to structure your summers, have fun and enjoy the journey.”

 

Here are some of my favorite summer learning activities:

 

  • Unit Learning– One summer we spend the whole summer studying all things Rainforest. We read, made hands-on projects, and celebrated by going to the Rainforest Cafe. I usually ask my kids what we want to learn about and go from there.

 

  • Character Building- Do you see some character training that needs tweaking? It is the perfect time to slow down and focus on their hearts.

 

  • Field Trips- Summertime gives us time to go on field trips and mini trips while dad is home from teaching public school. We enjoy learning new things as a family.

 

  • Reading Programs- We sign up our kids for summer reading programs at local libraries, Barnes and Noble, and Half Price Books. It is a great way to keep them reading while earning free books.

 

  • Finish A Subject– I find that every year we are needing to finish up math. It gives us time to finish and not rush. We summer school and then do something fun, such as swimming. It’s a great motivator to finish up your fractions.

 

These summer learning activities allow us to keep a routine and structure because my kids need that and I need that! However you decide to structure your summers, have fun and enjoy the journey.

 

 


Did you know SPED Homeschool is 100% donor funded?

Donate today

 

Please follow and like us:
error

 

SPED Homeschool Team

Have you ever wondered how your approach to summer homeschooling compares with other special education homeschooling families?  We did too, so we asked our community how they approach summer learning and this is what they told us.

 

Summer Homeschooling Poll Results

From our poll, here are the results we received:

 

46%

responded that they homeschool year-round and do not make any changes in the summer months.

 

23%

responded that they homeschool year-round but they make an effort during the summer to do more hands-on and play-oriented learning activities.

 

8%

responded they take the summer months off from formal schooling, but still incorporate lots of hands-on and play-oriented learning into their schedules.

 

8%

responded they continue with their delight-directed or unschooling methods as usual.

 

4%

responded they do their version of delight-directed or unschooling during the summer months.

 

And,

11%

responded that they were still in the process of figuring out what they were going to be doing for the summer months.

 

Summer may be a good time to try a different approach or even to make a switch to a new approach for the coming school year.

 

Choose Best for Your Situation

No matter what approach you decide to take, if you have considered what your child needs,  what types of breaks you need as a teacher, as well as what works best for your family, then you will find the best summer homeschooling approach for your unique situation.

 

One of our parents shared this great example of her summer homeschooling approach:

My son is 6 and right now we’re putting a heavier emphasis on non-academic skills (aka activities of daily life that he needs to learn to do to care for himself – like dressing, hygiene, etc). Unschooling as always in our school fits the best at this moment since formal academics are not our focus yet.” Lisa P.

 

Lisa’s comment is a great reminder that being flexible in your homeschooling approach can also extend into the full school year. Summer may be a good time to try a different approach or even to make a switch to a new approach for the coming school year.  

 

No matter how you choose to extend your homeschool learning over the summer we hope you enjoy the time with your children and create lots of great memories while learning together!

 

 


Did you know SPED Homeschool is 100% donor funded?

Donate today

 

Please follow and like us:
error

 

by Peggy Ployhar

 

You don’t have to be creative to take advantage of the many hands-on and out-of-the-box learning opportunities that summer affords us with our children.  Below you will find a blog round-up of some of our favorite articles that provide over 100 different ideas you can adapt for teaching your children this summer. Just click on the colored links below to get to these great articles.

 

Learning Adventures: Learning ideas to take on the road with you this summer to the campground, amusement park, and your local park.

Gardening Math: Ways to practice math skills while spending time with your kids in the garden.

Get Outside and Learn: Get outside with your kids this summer and boost their learning with these mostly free learning activities.

Field Trips and Stay-at-Home Learning Ideas: Take advantage of learning activities either out of the house or by just staying in by using these creative ideas to get the learning started.

Water Activities: Cool off and stimulate your child’s summer learning by using these creative activities.

Keep Active and Work on Developmental Skills: Keep those muscles in shape by doing some of these gross motor, fine motor, and visual motor activities every day.

Fun Family Unit Study: Create a unit study around anything your family wants to dive into learning about this summer and enjoy the theme-based learning fun all summer long.

 

Still looking for more ideas?  Check out theSPED Homeschool Summer Teaching Ideas Pinterest Board for even more creative summer learning activities and have fun this summer learning with your children.

 

 


Did you know SPED Homeschool is 100% donor funded?

Donate today

 

Please follow and like us:
error